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Archive for the ‘forest and bird’ Category

File:Buller Kakapo.jpg

DOC has managed to breed two kakapo using artificial insemination in what’s being hailed as a world first and a boost for critically-endangered birds everywhere.

Kakapo are notoriously slow to reproduce, and DOC hopes the breakthrough will now ensure the birds’ survival.

There are only 124 kakapo in existence, but with the help of artificial insemination, or AI, they may just be able to claw their way back from the brink of extinction.

“It’s just a fantastic tool for us to protect the future population of kakapo against further inbreeding, and also hopefully improve fertility rates,” says DOC’s Deirdre Vercoe.

“It’s a real breakthrough, a scientific breakthrough to achieve AI in a wild bird like this,” says Forest & Bird’s Chris Todd.

With more than 50 percent of kakapo eggs infertile, associate professor Ian Jameison says AI is a revolutionary tool in the fight for their survival.

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Forest and Bird Media Release

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The Threat Management Plan issued today to protect Hector’s and Maui’s dolphins is a good start, but must go further, Forest & Bird says.

Forest & Bird Conservation Advocate Kirstie Knowles says that the Government plan’s proposals to establish five marine mammal sanctuaries and introduce a ban on set nets wherever the endangered dolphins are found was a positive step.

“We applaud this as a step towards a nationwide ban on set nets. Set nets are not only the most serious threat to Hector’s and Maui’s dolphins – this indiscriminate fishing method also kills a wide range of marine life, including other dolphin species, penguins, seals, sharks, rays and seabirds. Only a nationwide ban will adequately protect Hector’s and Maui’s dolphins and other vulnerable marine life.” more

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Greater Wellington – A fish ladder for Hull’s Creek

Giant Kokopu (Galaxias argenteus) Photograph by R.M. McDowall

Inanga - Galaxias masculatus

inanga (Galaxias maculatus)

The Silverstream care group is a busy one. For over five years now it’s been working hard to restore the stream, create a native bird corridor, reduce erosion and create a walkway linking Silverstream to the Hutt River trail.

Since 2003 a total of 6,532 trees have been planted, willows removed, weeds controlled, and plans drawn up to construct a fish ladder, also called a fish pass. All this work is not for the faint-hearted – to begin with you need volunteers, funding and lots of planning.

Greater Wellington’s Team Leader Policy Development Murray McLea says one of the important things we know is the survival of many of our native fish depends on their migration between the sea and freshwater. “Creating a fish ladder over a weir will help native fish like the inanga (whitebait) and the giant kokopu jump the barrier. Weather permitting we hope to complete the fish ladder by late September.”

Barry Wards, convenor of the Silverstream care group says the Hull’s Creek Open Day on Saturday 11 August is celebrating the work, vision and enthusiasm of the group and the wider community. “Without funding from the Ministry for the Environment and Take Care funding from Greater Wellington the group would not have been able to restore Hulls Creek to what it is today.”

“We would like to welcome existing members and members of the public to the Open Day. The day will start with morning tea at 9.30 am, and include a talk by Dr Mike Joy, guided tours and unveiling of a sign. The day’s activities will finish at approximately 12.30 pm.”

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Scoop: Urgent action on albatross slaughter supported

 


Forest & Bird supports urgent measures
proposed by Fisheries Minister Jim Anderton to close the Kermadec Islands fishery to long-lining fishing after a vessel killed 51 albatrosses in a single trip.

 

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