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Archive for the ‘botanical’ Category

NZ ON SCREEN

To celebrate NZ’s unique natural taonga, Peter Hayden has curated a highlights collection from three decades of NHNZ productions. Aotearoa’s landforms and its magnificent menagerie of natural oddities – birds, insects, trees like nowhere else on the planet – are showcased in 15 award-winning titles. From Discovery Channel and David Bellamy, to Wild South and Our World classics.

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NZ

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Pohutukawa on coast

A thousand pohutukawa trees are being made available for planting on the Coromandel as part of efforts to get more of the iconic New Zealand trees flowering on the peninsula.

Regional council Environment Waikato and the Project Crimson Trust are partnering up for the project which will see the 1000 pohutukawa distributed to Coromandel landowners next winter.

“The aim is to get more pohutukawa established to help this much-loved species survive, and to ensure that future generations can enjoy the red Christmases the Coromandel is well known for,” said Environment Waikato land management officer Matt Highway.

“These trees will also support Peninsula Project soil conservation initiatives, improving biodiversity, water quality and soil stability,” said Mr. Highway.

EW will distribute the seedlings to landowners via the Peninsula Project soil conservation programme. They will also collect local pohutukawa and rata seed, which will be ready for planting in three years. This eco-sourcing ensures the distinctiveness of Coromandel plants and ecosystems.

Project Crimson Trust executive director Bridget Abernethy said: “We like partnering with organisations like Environment Waikato. We can take comfort that these trees are going to go to the most appropriate locations, that they will be planted by caring communities and that they will be protected for future generations.”

The Project Crimson Trust, set up in partnership with Meridian Energy and the Department of Conservation, is dedicated to the protection and enhancement of New Zealand’s pohutukawa and rata trees. Project Crimson Trust is celebrating 20 years this February 2010.

In 1989 around 90 per cent of the original area of pohutukawa in New Zealand was thought to have been lost. Much of what remained had been ravaged by possums, with very little regeneration evident. Since 1990, Project Crimson volunteers have planted almost half a million pohutukawa across New Zealand.

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Monday, 21 December 2009, 11:12 am
Press Release: NZ Plant Conservation Network

Climate change increases value of Kiwi native plant

The golden sand sedge – pingao – has won the New Zealand Plant Conservation Network’s 2009 favourite plant poll, and could be a valuable defence against climate change effects.

The pingao topped more than 100 species in the annual poll. Network President Philippa Crisp said that pingao would become increasingly important in combating the effects of climate change, particularly as an increasing number of coastal homes came under threat

“If the global plan to fight climate change stalls and sea level rises occur, pingao will become even more important to New Zealanders because it plays an important role in stabilising sand dunes and creating a beach contour that is not so vulnerable to storm events and sea level rises,” Dr Crisp said. “Pingao may be our only sustainable hope for coastal protection”.

full media release on scoop.co.nz

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Discover the hidden world of Wellington’s wild orchids: media releases

Pterostylis banksii (common greenhood), one of our most common orchids. Photo: Jeremy Rolfe/DOC.
Pterostylis banksii, one of our most
common orchids

Wellingtonians are being asked to keep their eyes peeled for their extraordinary, diverse and often cryptic native orchids when they venture into the outdoors.

Acknowledging the Wellington region as one of New Zealand’s “orchid hotspots”, the Department of Conservation has produced a field guide identifying 72 species of wild orchids in the lower North Island.

“We want to inspire people to head out and explore the region’s parks and reserves while searching for orchids that, once found, can be left for others to enjoy,” said Department of Conservation botanist John Sawyer, who co-authored the book with Peter de Lange, one of New Zealand’s leading plant conservation scientists; photographer and botanist Jeremy Rolfe, and national orchid expert Ian St George. full Media release

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Greater Wellington – Mauriceville community planting day

Mauriceville village will be further enhanced next month with the planting of native trees and shrubs during a HondaTree Fund Community Planting Day. The HondaTree Fund has provided the funding to purchase 300 trees and shrubs for this year’s event along with mulch and fertiliser.

The event has been organised to infill the areas planted during last year’s inaugural community planting day when 1000 native trees and shrubs were planted. more

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Greater Wellington – Rural living field day


20 August 2007

Greater Wellington Regional Council, AgResearch and Wellington City Council are hosting a rural living field day in Ohariu Valley for anyone interested in developing their rural lifestyle block.

Learn about landscape design, including what to plant, where and why and you can also take home a free native plant. Find out about the biodiversity-policy project, water quality testing and weed and pest control. An agricultural vet will be on site to answer any questions and there will be fencing displays. Competitions will be held throughout the day with face painting and a bouncy castle for the kids.

The event is free and will be held, wet or fine, on:

Date Saturday 8 September
Time 10.00am – 4.00pm
Venue Craig Shepherd and Julie Sammut’s property
583 Ohariu Valley Road
Ohariu Valley, Wellington

The biodiversity-policy project has been established in the Wellington region by Greater Wellington, Wellington City Council, Porirua City Council, the University of Waikato and AgResearch. The Foundation of Research, Science and Technology is assisting with part of the funding. Over the next two years the project team is working with the people of the Ohariu and Makara catchments to provide information about water quality in the streams, how landowner activities are likely to be affecting water quality, bush regeneration and how to improve life in the catchment for the community and biodiversity.

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Eagle’s Complete Trees and Shrubs of New
Zealand, a book that took author and painter, Audrey Eagle
more than 50 years to complete, is the winner of the 2007
Montana Medal for non fiction.

The two-volume work
contains more than 800 hand painted plates; images of every
single New Zealand tree and shrub, some of which are now
extinct. more

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