Honda Tree Fund Community Planting Day

Greater Wellington – Mauriceville community planting day

Mauriceville village will be further enhanced next month with the planting of native trees and shrubs during a HondaTree Fund Community Planting Day. The HondaTree Fund has provided the funding to purchase 300 trees and shrubs for this year’s event along with mulch and fertiliser.

The event has been organised to infill the areas planted during last year’s inaugural community planting day when 1000 native trees and shrubs were planted. more

Dolphin protection plan – must go further

Forest and Bird Media Release

https://i1.wp.com/www.careforthewild.com/graphics/hectorinnet2.jpg

The Threat Management Plan issued today to protect Hector’s and Maui’s dolphins is a good start, but must go further, Forest & Bird says.

Forest & Bird Conservation Advocate Kirstie Knowles says that the Government plan’s proposals to establish five marine mammal sanctuaries and introduce a ban on set nets wherever the endangered dolphins are found was a positive step.

“We applaud this as a step towards a nationwide ban on set nets. Set nets are not only the most serious threat to Hector’s and Maui’s dolphins – this indiscriminate fishing method also kills a wide range of marine life, including other dolphin species, penguins, seals, sharks, rays and seabirds. Only a nationwide ban will adequately protect Hector’s and Maui’s dolphins and other vulnerable marine life.” more

Island home planned for lizard species

Island home planned for lizard species and rescue bid for seagrass – 20 Aug 2007 – Pollution news – NZ Herald

Eight species of lizards are to be relocated to a local island as part of a plan designed to improve the health of Whangarei Harbour.

The plan, funded by Marsden Pt port owner Northport Ltd through a 10-year, $500,000 Whangarei Harbour Health Improvement fund, also includes work to restore beds of undersea grass.

Friends of Matakohe/Limestone Island Society intend to transfer eight lizard species to the island off suburban Onerahi in Whangarei Harbour.

Northport’s fund is granting $10,660 to cover first-year costs of the three-year lizard relocation project.

Planning for the relocation has been going on for about 10 years and involves sourcing lizards from mainland and island sites before quarantining and testing them for diseases.

The reptiles will then be moved to Matakohe/Limestone Island. more

Rural living field day

Greater Wellington – Rural living field day


20 August 2007

Greater Wellington Regional Council, AgResearch and Wellington City Council are hosting a rural living field day in Ohariu Valley for anyone interested in developing their rural lifestyle block.

Learn about landscape design, including what to plant, where and why and you can also take home a free native plant. Find out about the biodiversity-policy project, water quality testing and weed and pest control. An agricultural vet will be on site to answer any questions and there will be fencing displays. Competitions will be held throughout the day with face painting and a bouncy castle for the kids.

The event is free and will be held, wet or fine, on:

Date Saturday 8 September
Time 10.00am – 4.00pm
Venue Craig Shepherd and Julie Sammut’s property
583 Ohariu Valley Road
Ohariu Valley, Wellington

The biodiversity-policy project has been established in the Wellington region by Greater Wellington, Wellington City Council, Porirua City Council, the University of Waikato and AgResearch. The Foundation of Research, Science and Technology is assisting with part of the funding. Over the next two years the project team is working with the people of the Ohariu and Makara catchments to provide information about water quality in the streams, how landowner activities are likely to be affecting water quality, bush regeneration and how to improve life in the catchment for the community and biodiversity.

OSNZ publishes significant scientific resource

Scoop: OSNZ publishes significant scientific resource

Scientific knowledge about New Zealand birdlife took a great leap forward today as the Ornithological Society of New Zealand published the Atlas of Bird Distribution in New Zealand 1999-2004.

The atlas was launched today at Government House in Wellington by the Administrator of the Government, Rt. Hon. Dame Sian Elias. Birds are some of the best natural indicators of the health of our environment – an environment we like to promote as clean and green.

President of the Ornithological Society, Professor Richard Holdaway said that the bird distribution atlas has demonstrated dramatic and rapid changes in bird distribution in all parts of the country since the 1970s. As land use has changed, so have the communities of bird species in those areas.

Examples of this included areas that have changed from exotic forest to dairying, and areas that have reverted from cleared land to native scrub. Species that did well in the first habitat have been pushed out as the land was converted. Atlas project Convenor, Christopher Robertson notes that “Green in colour we may be, but these atlas surveys continue to demonstrate that some of that greenness is both increasingly monocultural, and the battleground of territorial invaders among the avifauna. New Zealand endemics are retreating to enclaves where introduced mammalian predators increasingly threaten the food supply, productivity, and individuals of remnant species.”    more

http://osnz.org.nz/

Robins the first birds to be transferred

Scoop: Robins the first birds to be transferred

North Island Robin with insect in beak. Photo: Ralph G. Powlesland.

Outward bound: North Island robins the first birds to be transferred out of Karori Sanctuary

Until now wildlife has arrived at Karori Sanctuary on a one-way ticket. But seven years after the first birds were released at the Sanctuary, bird numbers are booming and the Sanctuary is about to make its first outbound transfer – taking ten of its North Island robins to supplement the small population on Matiu/Somes Island. more

Baby tuatara hatches – a first for Matiu/Somes Island

News | Victoria University of Wellington

It’s official—tuatara are breeding on Matiu/Somes Island in Wellington Harbour.

Proof comes in the form of a tiny baby tuatara which emerged last
week from an egg found on the island. It’s the first known offspring of
54 Brothers Island tuatara transferred to the island nine years ago.

And
there may even be a sibling to follow. The egg was one of two taken
from a buried nest on the island in May to be incubated at Victoria
University of Wellington’s School of Biological Sciences.

The Department of Conservation and tuatara experts from Victoria
University of Wellington had long suspected the island’s “robust and
healthy” tuatara were breeding. But because the reptiles lead such
secretive lives, and bury their tiny eggs in the ground, they had no
tangible evidence—until the chance discovery of eggs beside a track on
the island. full story

Science Supports Forest Regeneration

 

A kereru fitted with transmitter

Scientific research being carried out in the Ngāi Tūhoe forests in
the central North Island is delivering valuable knowledge about
indigenous forest ecosystems and giving Maori landowners tools to
restore and preserve their native forest resource.

Over the past four years, Landcare Research scientists have been
working with the Tuawhenua Trust, to investigate why some canopy tree
species in the mainly forest-covered 10,000 hectares of land which is
dotted through the Urewera National Park and are managed by the Trust,
are not regenerating adequately.
more

Greater Wellington – A fish ladder for Hull’s Creek

Greater Wellington – A fish ladder for Hull’s Creek

Giant Kokopu (Galaxias argenteus) Photograph by R.M. McDowall

Inanga - Galaxias masculatus

inanga (Galaxias maculatus)

The Silverstream care group is a busy one. For over five years now it’s been working hard to restore the stream, create a native bird corridor, reduce erosion and create a walkway linking Silverstream to the Hutt River trail.

Since 2003 a total of 6,532 trees have been planted, willows removed, weeds controlled, and plans drawn up to construct a fish ladder, also called a fish pass. All this work is not for the faint-hearted – to begin with you need volunteers, funding and lots of planning.

Greater Wellington’s Team Leader Policy Development Murray McLea says one of the important things we know is the survival of many of our native fish depends on their migration between the sea and freshwater. “Creating a fish ladder over a weir will help native fish like the inanga (whitebait) and the giant kokopu jump the barrier. Weather permitting we hope to complete the fish ladder by late September.”

Barry Wards, convenor of the Silverstream care group says the Hull’s Creek Open Day on Saturday 11 August is celebrating the work, vision and enthusiasm of the group and the wider community. “Without funding from the Ministry for the Environment and Take Care funding from Greater Wellington the group would not have been able to restore Hulls Creek to what it is today.”

“We would like to welcome existing members and members of the public to the Open Day. The day will start with morning tea at 9.30 am, and include a talk by Dr Mike Joy, guided tours and unveiling of a sign. The day’s activities will finish at approximately 12.30 pm.”

Create another world in your own back yard

Create another world in your own back yard: media releases

Greater Wellington residents are offered help to transform their back yards into havens for native wildlife during Conservation Week (August 6 – 12).

They’ll receive a free native plant for their garden in exchange for a weed at a weed swap at The NewDowse, 45 Laings Road, Lower Hutt, Saturday 11 August, from 10am to 3pm.

The event will be hosted by the Department of Conservation and Hutt City Council, with support from Greater Wellington Regional Council.

Conservation Week competition and activities

Akatarawa Forest winter possum control

Greater Wellington – Akatarawa Forest winter possum control

Possum in Wineberry, Stewart Island. Photo: DOC.

Greater Wellington Regional Council is carrying out a large-scale aerial possum control operation using 1080 poison in the Akatarawa Forest from late July, weather permitting. The operation is expected to be complete by the end of August.

Greater Wellington’s Landcare Committee Chair, Councillor Chris Laidlaw says that the operation is necessary to protect the health of this future water collection area. “A healthy forest provides the best land cover for water supply purposes as it filters out impurities and minimises erosion. Recent monitoring has shown that possum numbers in the forest are approaching unacceptable levels since our last operation in 2002. We also need to protect our economic investment in the 3,000ha plantation forest, part of the overall 15,000ha forest.

“Without control, the possums will have a devastating effect on native vegetation, pine trees and native wildlife,” says Cr Laidlaw. more

Lifetime’s Work Wins Top Book Award

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Eagle’s Complete Trees and Shrubs of New
Zealand, a book that took author and painter, Audrey Eagle
more than 50 years to complete, is the winner of the 2007
Montana Medal for non fiction.

The two-volume work
contains more than 800 hand painted plates; images of every
single New Zealand tree and shrub, some of which are now
extinct. more